July 2008 Tampa Water Department News


Pipeline - A Publication of the Tampa Water Department


Regardless of size, a leak is no small matter.

Who hasn’t had a leak at one time or another? Leaks in the bathroom and kitchen are common. What shouldn’t be common is allowing leaks to go undetected or unrepaired.

A small leak, about the size of the head of a pin, dripping at one drop per second can add up to 7 gallons a day. A big leak, the kind most often associated with a toilet malfunction, can waste 200 gallons or more per day. Knowing where to look for leaks can help cut water waste. Why wait to be surprised by abnormally high water use when checking for leaks is so easy?

Let Your Water Meter Help

If you suspect you have a leak somewhere but the most likely sources (toilets, faucets and sprinkler systems) have checked out okay, enlist the help of your water meter.

Water Meter

  • First, make certain no water is being used inside or outside.
     

  • Locate your meter box, carefully remove the cover and lift the top of the meter.
     

  • Find the leak detector, the small red triangle on the face of the meter dial. If all your water sources are off, the leak detector should not be moving.
     

  • If the leak detector is rotating, you probably have a leak somewhere in your water pipes. You may need the services of a licensed professional to check for leaks and possible underground breaks in your service pipes.

 

Please be advised that the water meter lid may weigh 20 pounds or 57 pounds depending on which size is installed. Customers should not attempt to lift the lid unless they are physically capable of lifting the lid, and ensuring it is replaced immediately in order to avoid an unsafe condition.

More information on ways to reduce your water use and lower your water bill is available at www.TampaGov.net/SaveWater.
 


A Publication of the Tampa Water Department
 



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